Moldovan schlager

We think we all can agree on that sending that Ukrainian bloke to Vienna wasn’t the smartest move the Moldovans have made during the course of their short, but sweet Eurovision tenure. And they did indeed pay the price for the mistake as they crash landed in the semi-final. But why make another mistake the following year?

New year, new opportunities and this time around we will be treated to a generous serving of the best eurotrash the shady clubs of Chișinău can offer. Or the worst, depending on how you look at it. Because while 2016 is building up to becoming a Eurovision year for the books, brimming with high quality, modern songs, there’s just something that feels so insufficient with this generic number.

And whenever the word generic pops up you can bet your life on that there’s at least one Swede involved. Quelle surprise. It doesn’t seem fair that Moldova is now where the Swedish songwriters’ scrap material ends up. What happened? We do not approve of this unfortunate development. Moldova used to be good in Eurovision because they spiced up the competition with original tracks and a different approach. We urge the Moldovans to claim back the sovereignty over their own national selection process, rely on their own talent and reject these cheeky foreigners chucking their generic songs in everywhere.

We’re not dismissing the fact that Falling Stars is a catchy song bound to fill the dance floor in Euroclub. Given a revamp of the staging, like throwing in a couple of dancers and a massive backdrop filled with shooting stars it might not look half bad on TV either. However, Lidia Isac’s lifeless and static performance in the national final does not bode well for Stockholm. She needs a miracle to make it work.

1f93fa8bdb7b0df235ec9650dd9080cb
Back in 2011, Lidia Isac was the runner-up in the annual Mischa Barton lookalike competition. Well done!

4 Comments

Say Something